CONFLICT ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK

DEFINITION: Conflict Assessment Framework (CAF) is designed to identify key variables affecting conflict (including social, ethnic, political, economic, environmental) and reach a list of factors that most critically affect conflict. The CAF also examines how these variables are linked with poverty.

Conflict assessment framework is the map that shows different ways shareholders or conflicted partners see or view their conflict.

Conflict assessment is the first component of good strategic peace building. When taking conflict assessment one is recommended to use S.W.O.T which stands for Strength +Weakness +Opportunity +Threats. Conflict assessment assesses resources that contribute to the conflict, persons involved or level of foreign interference and above all persona who has the power to reach out to the majority at particular conflict to make effective peace thus identifying conflict influencers

Conflict assessment refers to the narrowly use of specific Conflict Assessment Framework (C.A.F).

BENEFITS OF CONFLICT ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK

  1. To shed light on the underlying factors of conflict.
  2. Shed light to those that fuel or support of the conflict
  3. To Highlight potential areas of concern
  4. So as to highlight   potential opportunities to effectively take part in resolving the conflict between parties.
  5. Most importantly to shed light potential conflict leverage areas.

An organization must first of all do self-assessment of the organizations actions +attitudes and identify its interest on the conflict. In order to conduct conflict assessment framework the organization ought to come up with the following aspects of conflict assessment

  • A better understanding of the conflict
  • Its ought to must anticipate conflict / have warning alarms
  • Batter forge common understanding

After information gathering the goal of any organization wishing to establish common grounds among the conflicted parties is remained with two main objective…….

EARLY WARNING SYSTEMS IN CONFLICT ZONES

Experience from the Conflict Early Warning and Response Network in the Horn of Africa can provide important lessons for the region and beyond, says Nalaye Ahmed

The importance of civil society engagement in peace rebuilding, multi-stakeholder cooperation, and multi-level implementation.” writes Ali Ahmed Ali

As part of our Somali Peace Building -funded project, ‘Capacities for Peace’, SPBRC will be working with early warning practitioners from the Horn of Africa to share experiences and reflect on lessons, good practices and challenges facing early warning system

Early Warning and Response Network

Mechanism established in 2002 to foster cooperation to tackle the rise of conflicts in the Horn of Africa region, and to contribute to the peaceful settlement of disputes.

Two broader lessons have also come out of this process that can be used to enhance effectiveness of early warning systems in and outside the region.

Firstly, it is key to set up frameworks allowing multi-stakeholder cooperation so networks can draw on a wide range of expertise from state, civil society, private sector, security and peacebuilding actors, and community groups for analysis and response.

Secondly, it is also critical that frameworks are implemented at all levels: from the local level where actors need to be empowered to respond to simmering tension and violence, to the national level where policy and political decisions need to take place to address more structural causes of conflicts.

Nalaye Ahmed is Project Manager for the Capacities for Peace programme, Ali Ahmed Ali is Project Coordinator, Somalia.

WRITING PEACE POLICY

With a history of inter-ethnic tension, land conflict and election-related violence, Somalia’s adoption of its long-awaited peace policy is a welcome step towards better coordinated efforts at building peace, argues Nalaye Ahmed

Local, state and federal governments, instead of treating civil society with mistrust and exploiting ethnic divisions, should allow space for CSOs to mediate between the government and the public. Civil society can promote citizens’ exercise of their rights and responsibilities while fostering open channels of communication that allow governments to hear and act on public concerns.(Somali Civil Society)

The need for a national framework to guide efforts to prevent conflict and build peace in Kenya cannot be overstated. For a long time Somalia was seen as the most problematic Nation of the Horn of Africa, with frequent incidents of tribal division fueled by the proliferation of small arms and light weapons. Political violence and tribal wars was experienced , raising concern about the country’s capacity to deal with such high levels of violence and the effectiveness of its early warning and response, mediation, and security deployment.

DIS-ADVENTAGEOUS OPPURTUNITIES

Today, despite the relative calm, the country still has a long way to go before being considered peaceful; there are misconceptions and misinterpretations around the implementation of devolution, tensions within and across counties over boundaries, and the discovery of oil and minerals further complicates inter-community relations. Somalia’s high number of unemployed youth remains a threat to the country’s stability, as they are at risk of being recruited into armed gangs or manipulated by politicians to intimidate their opponents and their supporters, and cause violence.

PEACE AND UNITY IN THE HORN OF AFRICA

REBUILDING CUSHITE ETHNIC COMMUNITIES TO DEVELOP

Experience from the Conflict Early Warning and Response Network in the Horn of Africa can provide important lessons for the region and beyond, says Nalaye Ahmed

The importance of civil society engagement in peace rebuilding, multi-stakeholder cooperation, and multi-level implementation.” writes Ali Ahmed Ali

As part of our Somali Peace Building -funded project, ‘Capacities for Peace’, SPBRC will be working with early warning practitioners from the Horn of Africa to share experiences and reflect on lessons, good practices and challenges facing early warning system

Early Warning and Response Network

Mechanism established in 2002 to foster cooperation to tackle the rise of conflicts in the Horn of Africa region, and to contribute to the peaceful settlement of disputes.

Two broader lessons have also come out of this process that can be used to enhance effectiveness of early warning systems in and outside the region.

Firstly, it is key to set up frameworks allowing multi-stakeholder cooperation so networks can draw on a wide range of expertise from state, civil society, private sector, security and peacebuilding actors, and community groups for analysis and response.

Secondly, it is also critical that frameworks are implemented at all levels: from the local level where actors need to be empowered to respond to simmering tension and violence, to the national level where policy and political decisions need to take place to address more structural causes of conflicts.

Nalaye Ahmed is Project Manager for the Capacities for Peace programme, Ali Ahmed Ali is Project Coordinator, Somalia.

peace commission

must-read formation of peace reforms commission

The new commission now sets out an infrastructure for peace, taking into account the context within which it will operate as well as the institutional mechanisms appropriate to the Somalia’s context

The commission proposes that representatives from communities, civil society and the government work together to prevent a range of conflicts, including resource-based, religious, cross-border, and tribal conflicts among others..

Time and again relapses into violence in various parts of the country have been as a result of uncoordinated efforts between countries officials and community civil society organizations .”

REBUILD TO MAKE THE HOPE ALIVE AGAIN

Finally! Peace Building Reforms Commission for Somalia

Competition over land remains a sensitive issue, with much unease over its allocation and redistribution across different regions. Land laws aimed at improving the situation are yet to be enacted, amounting to a perpetual injustice. Inter-ethnic tensions are further fueled by the rise of radicalization and frequent attacks by ‘extremist’ groups such as Al Shabaab.

Over the years, the Government of Somalia and non-state actors have made great efforts to prevent conflict, with interventions focusing on resolving social, political and economic grievances. The growth of peacebuilding organizations, the existence of the National Steering Committee on Peacebuilding and Conflict Management (NSC) and the establishment of provincial peace forums and district peace committees have been significant in the mitigation of conflicts – including pastoralist conflict

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